Programme 2018

Monaghan Association – Dublin, presents: 

Remembering Patrick Kavanagh – 2018.

Celebrating 20 years Remembering Patrick Kavanagh in Dublin.  

Buswells Hotel, Dublin, Tuesday, 23rd October, 2018.

 

Background:

Réamonn Ó’Donnchadha is author of “A True Note on a Slack String” [The Poetry of Patrick Kavanagh & the Psychology of C. G. Jung], “Chopin’s Grave [Poems] and other works on Developmental Psychology.

  • The presentation by Réamonn Ó’Donnchadha seeks to bring the wisdom of Kavanagh into the room, into the audience, individually and collectively, through the unadorned and uncontaminated words of his poetry. It is the act of hearing the words, the sounds and tones of his words, which brings them to life, and allows us to respond according to our own individual “Self”.

Peter McDonnell will give an account of this trip to Rome with photos from the Kavanagh Archive in UCD.

  • In October, 1965 Patrick Kavanagh attended the European Community of Writers General Meeting in Rome. The other Irish writers present were Desmond O’Grady and Kate O’Brien. Writers of all the European countries as well as the Eastern block countries including the Soviet Union attended. While in Rome Patrick Kavanagh stayed with the O’Grady family. He loved Rome and felt part of an international community of writers and artists. He was in his element, happy being respected as a major Irish Poet without having to play a role.

Eoghan Harris is a journalist, former RTE producer [7 Days, Feach], Abbey Theatre playwright [Souper Sullivan], screenwriter [Sharpe] and has also worked as a speechwriter for Mary Robinson and David Trimble. He currently writes a weekly column for the Sunday Independent.

  • Eoghan Harris will present on Reflections on patriotism and nationalism in the work of Patrick Kavanagh.


 

Programme:

1    A True Note on a Slack String”

The Illumination of Self through reading Patrick Kavanagh’s Poetry Aloud     

By: Dr Réamonn Ó’Donnchadha

Teacher, writer, poet and Jungian psychotherapist .

 

2   “Patrick Kavanagh in Rome” October, 1965

By: Peter McDonnell

Chairman, Monaghan Association – Dublin.

 

3   In Memory of Brother Michael”

Reflections on patriotism and nationalism in the work of Patrick Kavanagh

By: Eoghan Harris

Journalist, playwright, and former RTE producer.

Venue: Buswells Hotel, Molesworth St. Dublin 2

 

Date & Time:  Tuesday, 23rd October, 2018 @ 8 pm

 

Admission: €15  [pay at door]

 

 

Programme 2017

Monaghan Association – Dublin, presents:

Remembering Patrick Kavanagh – 2017.

Commemorating 50 years since his death on 30th Nov. 1967.

Buswells Hotel, Dublin, Tuesday, 24th October, 2017.


Background:

  • Patrick Kavanagh’s epic poem The Great Hunger was written while he lived in 122, Morehampton Rd. in Oct. 1941 and was first published in Horizon Magazine in January 1942 under the title The Old Peasant. It was published by the Cuala Press in late 1942. Kavanagh wrote that the Great Hunger contained ‘some queer & terrible things’ but the poem can also be seen as a marker in his own work and in the evolutionary march of Irish and world culture in the 20th The Great Hunger also signalled Ireland’s coming of age politically, socially and economically. Despite his later rejection of the poem it marks Kavanagh’s own development as person and poet, its immense literary quality and its remarkable psychological insight. Desmond Swan will explore the elements which mark The Great Hunger out as a milestone in Ireland’s slow coming of age.
  • In the summer of 1966, one year before Patrick Kavanagh died, James Plunkett, head of features in RTE asked Adrian Cronin to make a TV documentary on the Poet. They filmed the Poet in his home village of Inniskeen and in Dublin. It was the last filmed documentary of the Poet [died 30th 1967] and is therefore an important historical record of his life and times. Godfrey Graham was the cameraman who photographed this film in 16mm black and white. Godfrey maintains that working on this film was one of the most satisfying assignments during his long career in RTE. During filming Godfrey got to know the Poet and was intrigued when he realised how Kavanagh was overjoyed that the National Television station had sought fit to make a programme on his career, having experienced poverty and rejection for most of his life. Godfrey Graham will introduce the film with some background information.

Programme: 

  1. Some Queer and Terrible Things” in Patrick Kavanagh’s epic Poem ‘The Great Hunger’

By: Desmond Swan

Professor emeritus of Education, UCD.

Author of ‘Apocalypse of Clay’- A Study of The Great Hunger.

Readings by Mary Swan.

 

  1. The Poet Patrick Kavanagh.” A Documentary.

Introduced by Godfrey Graham

RTE cameraman and author of ‘Forty Years Behind the Lens’.


Venue : Buswells Hotel, Molesworth St. Dublin 2

Date & Time : Tuesday, 24th October, 2017 @ 8 pm

Admission: €10  [pay at door]

Monaghan Association – Dublin, presents:

Remembering Patrick Kavanagh – 2017.

Commemorating 50 years since his death on 30th Nov. 1967.

Buswells Hotel, Dublin, Tuesday, 24th October, 2017.


Background:

  • Patrick Kavanagh’s epic poem The Great Hunger was written while he lived in 122, Morehampton Rd. in Oct. 1941 and was first published in Horizon Magazine in January 1942 under the title The Old Peasant. It was published by the Cuala Press in late 1942. Kavanagh wrote that the Great Hunger contained ‘some queer & terrible things’ but the poem can also be seen as a marker in his own work and in the evolutionary march of Irish and world culture in the 20th The Great Hunger also signalled Ireland’s coming of age politically, socially and economically. Despite his later rejection of the poem it marks Kavanagh’s own development as person and poet, its immense literary quality and its remarkable psychological insight. Desmond Swan will explore the elements which mark The Great Hunger out as a milestone in Ireland’s slow coming of age.
  • In the summer of 1966, one year before Patrick Kavanagh died, James Plunkett, head of features in RTE asked Adrian Cronin to make a TV documentary on the Poet. They filmed the Poet in his home village of Inniskeen and in Dublin. It was the last filmed documentary of the Poet [died 30th 1967] and is therefore an important historical record of his life and times. Godfrey Graham was the cameraman who photographed this film in 16mm black and white. Godfrey maintains that working on this film was one of the most satisfying assignments during his long career in RTE. During filming Godfrey got to know the Poet and was intrigued when he realised how Kavanagh was overjoyed that the National Television station had sought fit to make a programme on his career, having experienced poverty and rejection for most of his life. Godfrey Graham will introduce the film with some background information.

Programme: 

  1. Some Queer and Terrible Things” in Patrick Kavanagh’s epic Poem ‘The Great Hunger’

By: Desmond Swan

Professor emeritus of Education, UCD.

Author of ‘Apocalypse of Clay’- A Study of The Great Hunger.

Readings by Mary Swan.

 

  1. The Poet Patrick Kavanagh.” A Documentary.

Introduced by Godfrey Graham

RTE cameraman and author of ‘Forty Years Behind the Lens’.


Venue : Buswells Hotel, Molesworth St. Dublin 2

Date & Time : Tuesday, 24th October, 2017 @ 8 pm

Admission: €10  [pay at door]

Programme 2016

Monaghan Association – Dublin, presents:

Remembering Patrick Kavanagh – 2016.

A celebration of his life & times

Buswells Hotel, Dublin, Tuesday, 8th November, 2016.


 

Background:

  • Patrick Kavanagh was born in 1904 in Mucker, Inniskeen, Co Monaghan. He lived and worked here ‘till 1939 when he moved to Dublin to become a full time writer. He said it was “the worst mistake of my life. I had my comfortable little holding of watery hills beside the Border. What was to bate it for a life? The Monaghan-Armagh-Louth border was not a severe test for a true stayer carrying top weight….”

Inniskeen and surrounding areas became part of the Border region with Northern Ireland after partition and it is this feature that gives Monaghan and other border areas their unique culture.

Professor Mary E. Daly will examine how these events have influenced the cultural and economic prosperity of these border regions.

  • Patrick Kavanagh first met Katherine Barry Moloney in London in 1959. Katherine was 31 and Patrick was 55. They had been introduced by Anthony and Thèrèse Cronin, friends of both. Katherine’s mother was the eldest sister of Kevin Barry, the 18 year old medical student who was hanged in 1920 during the war of Independence. Following a year in Paris Katherine moved to London in the mid-fifties and through her friendship with the Cronins and Leland Bardwell began mixing in a circle of artists and writers. Katherine and Patrick were married on 19th April, 1967, seven months before Patrick died. Katherine’s sister Mary married Padraig O’Halpin, an engineer and published poet [The Bell], and it was in this milieu that Eunan O’Halpin grew up.

Professor Eunan O’Halpin will describe growing up in those times and recall a past generation which was part of Bohemian Dublin.

 

Programme 2016 : Tuesday, 8th November, 2016

 

  1. Kavanagh Country : A Border Community

By : Mary E. Daly

Professor of History, UCD and first woman president of

The Royal Irish Academy.

                                  

  1. The Moloney Family & Bohemian Dublin

By : Eunan O’Halpin

Professor of Contemporary Irish History, TCD.

 

Venue :               Buswells Hotel, Molesworth St. Dublin 2

Date & Time :   Tuesday, 8th November, 2016 @ 8 pm

Admission:       €10  [ pay at door ]